Avoid Being an Analog Communicator in a Digital World :: Springboard Training

Avoid Being an Analog Communicator in a Digital World

SylviaH • April 27th, 2010 

radio_boombox01An auditory person best communicates using “sound words” such as “hear, state, talk, and speak”. Repeat or rephrase your message verbally in order to effectively communicate with this person. He retains the spoken better than the written word. Someone who is kinesthetic best communicates using “feeling and texture words” such as “feel, grasp, and touch”. He retains information best through active hands-on-experiences and sensory triggers that involve taste and smell.

As with any categorization or generalization involving people, communication channels are seldom “either / or” in any one person. We use all of our senses when we communicate and receive messages in all of these ways at one point in time or another. The signals we provide in the words we use represent our primary communications channels rather than our only channels. Listen for the types of words a person uses the most and those words indicate the most-effective means by which that person receives, translates (interprets), and retains (understands) what it is you have to communicate.

The best way to communicate is to use a little of each type of wording to be sure you reach as many senses as possible. For example: an interviewer asks you to tell her how you handled a time when you were disappointed at an outcome. You lean forward and describe the following scenario. “Imagine a busy classroom environment with a cacophony of voices providing a continuous background of noise. Your body is tense with anticipation of the news; people shift around in their seats unable to sit still; a cell phone buzzes as it vibrates, jolting everyone’s attention to one area of the room. Suddenly someone moans in despair, ‘I just received the a message that I didn’t make the team!’ I realized–too late–that that someone was me. And this is how I handled the disappointment.” This scenario connects with the listener on many levels. Saying “imagine” means they must do so. You paint a picture of the scene (visual), describe sounds (auditory), and evoke feelings (kinesthetic). Continue with a story of how you handled the disappointment and you hold the interviewer captivated on multiple levels.

Take the time to tune into other people’s channels and you can adjust how you communicate messages to best ensure they are heard and understood. Employ aspects of multiple channels for your most effective means of communicating.

Reference: Additional words to consider using for each channel:

  • Visual – analyze, clear, demonstrate, distinguish, examine, focus, horizon, illustrate, observe, outlook, perceive, perspective, picture, pinpoint, reveal, see, show, notice, view, vague, watch.
  • Auditory – alarm, announce, articulate, ask, audible, compose, converse, discuss, earshot, enunciate, inquire, interview, listen, loud, mention, noise, pronounce, remark, report, ring, say, scream, shout, silence, sound, speechless, tell, tone, tune, voice.
  • Kinesthetic – active, carry, concrete, emotional, feel, foundation, grasp, heated, hit, hold, impact, impress, irritate, motion, panic, pressure, rush, sensitive, shallow, sharpen, shock, solid, stress, support, tension, tired, touch, unbearable.

Sylvia’s Blog on This Topic: http://www.subscribe2succeed.com/members/successtraining/blog/VIEWO+00000003+00000035


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